HUD RELEASES 2008 ANNUAL HOMELESS ASSESSMENT REPORT TO CONGRESS

from http://www.usich.gov/

HUD RELEASES 2008 ANNUAL HOMELESS ASSESSMENT REPORT TO CONGRESS; OVER A BILLION DOLLARS IN HOMELESSNESS PREVENTION AND RAPID RE-HOUSING PROGRAM AWARDS ALSO ANNOUNCED

–>

–>

<!–

–>

<!–

IN THE NEWS
<!–
RESOURCES AND TOOLS

NEWSROOM

<!–2007 News | –>

  • What They’re Saying . . .

  • News Archive

  • e-Newsletter Archive
  • Map

    <!–

    horizontal rule

    MORE 10 YEAR PLAN COMMUNITIES REPORT DECREASES IN CHRONIC HOMELESSNESS

    –>

    Image: U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development LogoJuly 10. The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development has issued its 2008 Annual Homeless Assessment Report to Congress, a national study that explores changes in homelessness nationwide. HUD’s assessment concludes that while overall homelessness in America held fairly steady from 2007 to 2008, the number of homeless families, particularly those living in suburban and rural areas, increased.

    HUD measures homelessness through the Annual Homeless Assessment Report in two ways: Point-In-Time ‘Snapshots’– this data accounts for sheltered and unsheltered homeless persons on a single night, usually at the end of January. Homeless Management Information Systems – this data provides more detailed information on persons who access a shelter over the course of a full year. In the 2008 AHAR, 222 local communities contributed HMIS data to produce national estimates of sheltered homeless. HUD estimates that approximately 1.6 million persons experienced homelessness and found shelter between October 1, 2007 and September 30, 2008. HUD notes that the 2008 Report “is the fourth Annual Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) and the first to provide year-to-year trend information on the prevalence of homelessness nationwide, the demographic characteristics of homeless people, and the way homeless people use the residential services system.”

    According to HUD, key findings from this new report include:

    • About 664,000 people nationwide were homeless – either sheltered or unsheltered – on a single night in January 2008, down about 7,500 people (or one percent) from the previous year.
    • The number of people using homeless residential programs during the course of the year remained steady. Between October 1, 2007 and September 30, 2008, approximately 1.6 million homeless people used shelters or transitional housing programs at least once.
    • While the number of homeless individuals in shelters was about the same as last year, the number of people in families increased by 9% to 516,700, suggesting that family homelessness was on the rise at the time of the data collection.
    • Homeless persons in shelters and on the street continued to be most heavily concentrated in urban areas. One in five people homeless on a single night in January were located in Los Angeles, New York, and Detroit.
    • However, in the twelve months ending on September 30, 2008, the share of the sheltered homeless populations in suburban and rural areas increased substantially, from 23 percent in 2007 to 32 percent in 2008.
    • There were early signs that the economic crisis may have affected trends in homelessness nationally. Notably, a greater share of people accessing the homeless system in 2008 came from stays with friends and family and from places where they had lived a year or more, suggesting that people who had been stably housed were becoming homeless after exhausting their housing options.

    In addition to the release of the annual report, HUD Secretary Shaun Donovan, who was recently elected Chairperson of the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, announced that HUD is, for the first time ever, beginning to measure homelessness on a quarterly basis to gain a better understanding of the impact of the current economic crisis on homelessness. “The annual report tells us a great deal but it also begs many questions about how today’s housing crisis and job losses are playing out in our shelters and on our streets,” said Secretary Donovan. “The Administration’s aggressive approach to economic recovery recognizes that during these difficult times, families in certain areas of the country are at extreme risk of falling into homelessness. With our new Quarterly Homeless Pulse Report, we will be able to better understand the impact of the current economic crisis on homelessness across the country.” Read the first “Homelessness Pulse Project” report.

    Advertisements

    Leave a Reply

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s